Social relations

 Social relationships

 Self-regulation

 Lying in families

Rianne_nieuw
Photo by Wilma van der Hel

Dr. Rianne Kok

Researcher Clinical Child & Family Studies

Since starting my research career over ten years ago, the question of why some children struggle more than others to act according to the social norms and values of their family, school, and society has fascinated me. My research contributes to a better understanding of the social origins of children’s regulation of behavior, emotions, and cognition and their moral development in early childhood. Focusing on ecological validity and observational paradigms, I aim to better understand how children adapt to various social settings. As a lecturer, I aspire to inspire students to critically reflect on scientific and societal issues in the field of clinical child and family studies, and actively involve them in my ongoing research projects. A major drive in my academic career is my close connections with (inter)national research colleagues and students, societal partners, families, and schools.

Research Areas

I endeavor to explore how early social relationships and interactions shape the regulation of cognitive and emotional processes that help one to function according to social norms and standards in society.

SELF-regulation

I study the development of self-regulation in early childhood and how this is shaped by family and school contexts

dysregulation

I investigate how dysregulation is passed on in highly vulnerable families characterized by psychopathology or socio-economic difficulties

Lying in families

Using novel methodologies and unique perspectives, I aim to identify the early roots of lying and moral dissonance within families 

SELF-regulation

I investigate the development of self-regulation in early childhood and how this is shaped by factors in the family and school context

dysregulation

I study how dysregulation is passed on in highly vulnerable families characterized by psychopathology or socio-economic difficulties

lying in families

Using novel methods and unique perspectives, I aim to identify the early roots of lying and moral dissonance within families 

The Fami-LIES Study

Children who lie, typically learn this from a very young age. In early childhood, families provide the basis for the moral education of their children. Parents sometimes lie to children (for example: claiming to leave their child behind when it is misbehaving) or model lying to children (for example: telling someone they love a gift while admitting to their child they dislike it). Socialization of child lying might even be paradoxical: despite occasionally lying or modeling lying, many parents teach their children that lying is wrong. No studies to date have addressed the causes and consequences of these mixed messages or “moral dissonance” in families. In the Fami-LIES study, I will explore and explain how and why parents lie to children, how this contrasts with what they teach, and how lying and moral dissonance relate to child socio-emotional and moral outcomes.

The Fami-LIES Study

Children who lie, typically learn this from a very young age. In early childhood, families provide the basis for the moral education of their children. Parents sometimes lie to children (for example: claiming to leave their child behind when it is misbehaving) or model lying to children (for example: telling someone they love a gift while admitting to their child they dislike it). Socialization of child lying might even be paradoxical: despite occasionally lying or modeling lying, many parents teach their children that lying is wrong. No studies to date have addressed the causes and consequences of these mixed messages or “moral dissonance” in families. In the Fami-LIES study, I will explore and explain how and why parents lie to children, how this contrasts with what they teach, and how lying and moral dissonance relate to child socio-emotional and moral outcomes.

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